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Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors, Denge

Sound Mirrors, Denge

Sound Mirrors, Denge

Sound Mirrors, Denge

It a while since I have posted any stereo images, so if you are new to this, to resolve the image go cross eyed until the two images register on top of each other – you will see three images and need to concentrate on the middle one. If you are having problems make the image smaller. You might find tilting your head either way to make sure the images are horizontal with your eyes can also help. Once you have the 3D image, try to relax and the depth will emerge. The lower image is quite distorted but gives a gratifying depth.

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Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

While at the sound mirrors last weekend there was a man with recording equipment who was working with them in their intended range of performance. I suspect he was fishing to close to the surface and too low on the dish to find anything other than aircraft, but would be fascinated to hear what he caught.

 

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Sound Mirrors

Another vist to the Denge Sound Mirrors today, the last of the summer open days when there is access to the island where three sound mirrors sit. I will sift through the photographs and post a few more tomorrow. The site only opens after two O’clock, when the sun has already passed the reflective surface of the mirrors, so most of my pictures are of the rear surfaces. As the position of the sun changed the texture, facets and board marks conspired with the geometry to provide a lesson in sciagraphy. I will post some examples tomorrow.

Denge Sound Mirrors

Denge Sound Mirrors

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Some views of the three experimental sound mirrors at Denge near Dungeness. When I first visited you could walk out to them (in the middle of a gravel pit). There is no longer any mining there and a swing bridge keeps the island with the mirrors on secure. They were built as a way of listening out for and locating hostile aeroplanes. but they were made redundant by the emerging radar technologies. There are a few more dotted along the coast. The largest mirror (to the left in the bottom view) is 200 feet across.