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Natural History

Museum of Comparative Anatomy

Museum of Comparative Anatomy

I posted some tortoises earlier that had only vestigial spines and few if any ribs, using their shell as a stressed structure. These, from the Museum of Comparative Anatomy in Paris, have a complete spine and ribs. It works quite well in stereo, so have a go.

To resolve in stereo, go cross eyed so that one image registers over the other (register features rather than the frame). When you see three images concentrate on the middle one and relax until the three dimensional image pops out. If you have problems, make the image smaller.

University Museum

University Museum

University Museum

University Museum

University Museum

University Museum

University Museum

University Museum

Some wrapped mammal skeletons, protected while the University Museum in Oxford is re-arranged.

To view them in 3D, go cross eyed so the same distinct element from each image register with each other. If you have trouble resolving the image, tilt your head slightly from side to side to make sure the horizons match. When you have resolved the image try to relax to find the full depth of the image. If you are finding this difficult, click on the image and reduce it to a more manageable size.

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

IMG_2843 IMG_2842

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum

A few more examples of flattened fossils. as before, the interest is especially in the spines where a few displaced vertebra reveal both the elevation and the section. The flatness is a little like a low relief (see the friezes a few posts back) that exist between the drawing and the object.

From the Natural History Museum in London

I have made a few posts on James Perry Wilson’s work. If you are interested in finding out more about  him, the place to go is here: (or click on the word here)

http://peabody.yale.edu/james-perry-wilson

Michael Anderson has been writing Wilson’s biography for some time and has just released chapter eight, which covers Wilson’s work in the North American Mammal Hall at the American Museum of Natural History. Well worth a read.

When I was doing my research into Wilson’s projection methods Michael Anderson was amazingly helpful, both with his knowledge and expertise but also in arranging access to material and sites. He is the Wilson expert.

Giant turtle

I have been looking at a number of turtle and tortoise skeletons. They seem to have most of the pieces that a mammal would have but some (as with the one above) do away with a redundant spine. Others appear to have a vestigial spine in parallel to the (structural) shell. This one is from the museum of comparative anatomy in the Jardin de Plants in Paris in the dinosaur section. The view below is of the same gallery from the balcony.

 

To resolve the stereoscopic images go cross eyed until a part in one image registers with the same part in the other. This should give you three images, where you concentrate on the middle one. Try to relax – if you have the images registered over each other the three dimensions will appear and then gain depth as you become more comfortable with it. If you are having trouble registering the images, click on the image to see it in a separate window and make the image smaller until you can resolve the stereoscopic image.

Parisian Dinosaurs

I am working on some new drawings – I hope to have some new things up in the next couple of weeks.