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Monthly Archives: June 2012

55/02

I received this very nice book today from Bob Sheil, one of the talented group called Sixteen*(makers) that includes Nick Callicott (based in Germany), Phil Ayres (in Copenhagen) and Bob who is a professor at the Bartlett. It is about their delightful project in Kielder Forrest (see the picture above). It is published by Riverside Architectural Press and comes highly recommended.

15/02

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Camera Constructs

I received my copy of Camera constructs. My chapter got a bit mashed up in the editing process – it mainly covers the Cold Bog diorama cameras (see here and here) and the diormamscopes (see here) -but there are a few nice chapters. It is quite expensive (and sadly all in black and white) but if anyone is interested here is a flyer with an introductory offer.

Flyer

Drawings in Progress

Here is the front side of the drawings shown from the back a couple of posts ago. The right way round and the right way up, although when they are drawn on they will work from a range of angles, not just the frontal as shown here. As you can see, the angle of the folds changes slightly in each one. The holes are to take a bracket for a model component. Lots more to do.

Paint throw from Instrument Five

I’m not sure if I posted this photograph before, it is a high-speed flash photograph from the Instrument No.5 series. I have been looking back over these to understand how to make the new drawings and like the range of paint to drawing piece / picture plane engagement. Almost the whole story held in one image. The strands of paint connecting the drawing pieces to the picture plane also show a promising range of discussions. Note the meniscus of paint in the upper right hand drawing piece ring.

If you click on the image you will see it a little bit larger.

Rear view of new set of drawings

Here is a rear view of a new set of drawings I am working on. THey are on their side – seen normally the top is to the right. The blue is masking tape on the drawing side that is folded over round the back. The drawing surface is  folded in slightly different ways in each one  for a sequence that will combine some old ideas about how to draw spatial consciousness and an adaptation of the process used with instruments Five and Seven. The back layer provides the stiffness to hold the shape of the folds and has all the cut outs to keep with down. The protruding parts register and hold the angle of the folds.

I will post some more when the drawings on the front have progressed a bit further.

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

Tin Town

I am indebted to Robert Adams from the University of Michigan for alerting me to Tin Town, on the south shore of Lake Manitoba. A series of small hunting huts off the grid and now somewhat devastated by the flooding from the spring of 2011. I went out there today and this is some of what I found.

There are some new drawings in progress – I will post on them soon.