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Monthly Archives: April 2013

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

When you drive to Brighton from London there is a point where you meet the sea at the Palace Pier (in the distance in the top photograph). There is a roundabout that leads to the coast roads in either direction and an extra road heading east that is Madeira Drive. This road absorbs events that end up in Brighton, today’s example being a pride(?) of Jaguars. The coast road and a promenade look down on Madeira Drive and a series of staircases and a lift (elevator) join these levels. When nothing is happening, they provide alternative routes along the beach without the melancholy of, say, the boardwalk at Colney Island out of season. When an event is taking place the various levels provide both the infrastructure and a ready theatre for things to take place.

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

Madeira Drive

IMG_6990 IMG_6995 IMG_6998

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Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

The consensus seems to be that the white covers are to protect the most friable gravestones from frost action (but the Titanic story appeals more).

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

Old Burying Ground

I am in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the Old Burying Ground in the middle of town has a bunch of shrouds over the grave stones. I was here last year and was told that the similar devices then were to commemorate the graves of those who died on the Titanic, but the plaque on the gates suggests that burials stopped before the Titanic sank. I will try to find out more, and post some 3D pictures tomorrow or the next day.

Photo: Phoebe Chard

Photo: Phoebe Chard

Photo: Phoebe Chard

Photo: Phoebe Chard

Photo: Phoebe Chard

Photo: Phoebe Chard

Casting large sections of concrete is normally done in stages, where the previous pour is left to partially set before casting the next section. The Hoover dam was cast continuously in multiple sections, with careful temperature control, but it is an exception. The joint between the new and previous pour is tricky if the aim is to produce a monolithic continuity. The top of the previous pour has relatively little force on it, while the bottom of the new pour on top of it has the weight and pressure of all the concrete above it, pushing the formwork out further than the top of the previous pour. You can see that in this example in Winnipeg, where the second pour starts to fill the gap of the pushed out formwork, and the thickness of the wall increases at the bottom of the second pour. This example is for a housing project, but this similar examples can be found all over the Prairies in the bases to grain silos, where the sort of care normally taken in architectural situations is not required. Once solidified, the forces of formation are petrified in the joint.

Thanks to Phoebe chard for the Photos.

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

The Happiest Man

In the deepest bowels under the University of Westminster on the Marylebone Road is Ilya and Emilia Kabakov’ “The Happiest Man”. The space is largely filled with old cinema seats. The large screen shows segments of rousing Soviet films of rural progress from several decades cut fairly seamlessly together. To one side of the seats (see top picture) is a large box, which contains a room with an atmosphere resonant with several of their previous installations. You can see the film through the window. As with much of their other work, the construction provokes delightfully strange and conflicting thoughts. Well worth a visit if you in London, open until 21st April.

 

Details www.p3exhibitions.com

Clyde Chase Studio, Schindler House

Clyde Chase Studio, Schindler House

A stereo view of Clyde Chase’s studio in the Schindler House. The tilt slab wall sections can be seen through the open canvas screens in the middle.

To view the stereo images, go cross-eyed until one image registers perfectly over the other. You will see three images- concentrate on the middle one. Focus and relax until the three dimensional image appears. If you are having difficulty make the images smaller.