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Monthly Archives: January 2013

Instrument Two

Instrument Two

Quite a few people have asked about the contents of the drawers on Instruments Two and Three.

Here they are in sequence:

Spare fittings

Spare fittings

Tools

Tools

Spare Parts

Spare Parts

And a spare pair of eyes..

And a spare pair of eyes..

The contents of the bottom drawer is a Victorian pari of glass eyes in their uncut blown state. They are set 65mm apart (the typical separation). They are a reminder of the ambiguous state of the instrument in dealing with the pictorial structure of the picture plane, which negotiates between the three and two dimensional worlds.

Where I used to live...

Where I used to live…

New Street

Our new street…

Our world arriving in stereo

Our world arriving in stereo

The view from the end of my street

The view from the end of my street

Between us and the beach...

Between us and the beach…

Just to illustrate the last post, we have moved from Winnipeg to Brighton, quite a change. Our new street looks out on the sea, a great pleasure when leaving the house in the morning. Also strange and fun worlds between the city and beach. Should be up and running soon….

 

Instrument Six (Nat Chard)

Instrument Six (Nat Chard)

Instrument Six (Nat Chard)

Instrument Six (Nat Chard)

Instrument Six (Nat Chard)

Instrument Six (Nat Chard)

A group of quite old pictures of Instrument Six in stereo. THere is quite a lot going on so the 3D view clarifies them. The top view is of the instrument in photographic mode with a single bulb as a light source while the lower two are of the instrument in real-time mode where you can see the floating shadow directly. For those new to the blog, Instrument Six is able to separate an objects shadow from the surface on which it should land and get the shadow to float in mid air. It is explained in earlier posts, for instance here and here.

Use the normal process for resolving the stereo images.

Mount

Mount

 

I have posted a few dinosaur armatures on this blog. I enjoy the precision of the support, not only for the bones and their relation to each other but also the character of the animal that is given by the pose that the bones are set in. It is a more intimate precision than that found in the arms of planetary models, for example, which are far more abstract.

This mount is from the Museum of Comparative Anatomy in Paris (I have posted some pictures of the mammal and dinosaur skeletons from the same museum previously). It holds a skull fragment that is clearly not the item that it was originally made for (it appears to be for a skull with a lower support for the jaw). The precision of the mount to fit the original bones comes not only through the geometry but also the delicacy of its structure. It also implies a strange hybrid of the original skull with the imposter  fragment.

View previous posts for suggestions on how to resolve the stereo image.